USA judge approves Volkswagen 3.0 litre, Bosch diesel settlements

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The final terms see Volkswagen paying out another $1.22 billion to fix or buy back the roughly 80,000 affected 3.0-liter V-6 TDI-powered vehicles.

"The court finds the settlements are fair, adequate and reasonable", Judge Breyer said.

The deadline to file a claim is December 31st, 2019 and vehicle buyback values will be calculated from September 18th, 2015 which is the date the allegations of emissions cheating became public.

These models can not be repaired to meet their originally certified emission standards, so owners will likely opt for a buyback or trade-in. If the vehicles cannot be fixed then they will be offered buybacks. The lead attorney for consumer plaintiffs, Elizabeth Cabraser, also welcomed the ruling from the California judge and said, "We believe the substantial compensation and steps to fix or remove polluting cars from the roads detailed in the settlements provide excellent value to consumers and hold Volkswagen to account".

Those who own newer cars will get compensation of $7,039 to $16,114. If their cars cannot be fixed to meet standards then their lawyers can return to court to apply for buybacks. Elizabeth Cabraser added, "We believe the substantial compensation and steps to fix or remove polluting cars from the roads detailed in the settlements provide excellent value to consumers and hold Volkswagen and Bosch accountable for their breach of consumer trust".

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Volkswagen earlier agreed to a settlement worth up to $14.7 billion and offered to buyback 475,000 2.0-liter polluting vehicles that emitted up to 40 times legally allowable emissions.

All told, VW is committed to spending upwards of $24.5 billion in North America to settle lawsuits and buy back or fix some 560,000 vehicles armed with algorithms intentionally installed to trick emissions tests. Volkswagen has admitted to installing the software on almost 600,000 diesel-powered vehicles in the US and some 11 million vehicles globally.

Last month VW was sentenced to three years probation after pleading guilty to three felony counts on emission test cheating. Over the next three years, VW must test all of its USA vehicles using portable emissions measurement system testing - a method created to capture real world emissions and deter cheating.

On Thursday, U.S. District Judge Charles Breyer also approved a separate $327.5-million settlement with German auto parts maker Robert Bosch GmbH, which helped design the software that enabled vehicles to cheat emissions tests.

On top of the consumer compensation, the company must also pay $225 million for environmental remediation after the 3-liter diesel vehicles spewed nitrogen oxide at excessive rates.

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